Education and schools work update

Headlines from the world of education and schools work:

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Education and schools work update

Headlines from the world of education and schools work:

Education and schools work update

Headlines from the world of education and schools work:

Education and schools work update

Headlines from the world of education and schools work:

Education and schools work update

Headlines from the world of education and schools work:

Education and schools work update

Headlines from the world of education and schools work:

Michael Gove condemns charities’ ‘don’t touch’ warning to teachers: The education secretary said telling teachers to avoid physical contact with students was ‘playing to a culture of fear’

GCSE league tables: thousands of pupils failing in key subjects: Up to 500,000 teenagers are leaving school without a decent grasp of traditional academic subjects, league tables show.

Head urges parents to apply for free meals: Parents who fail to claim for free school meals for their children, despite being eligible for them, are being urged by a secondary head to apply in order to boost school funding under the new pupil premium scheme announced last month.

The King’s Speech shines light on stammering: Just as The King’s Speech puts a spotlight on children who stammer, services to help them are being cut

‘70% would drop out’ if EMA is scrapped: Seven in 10 poor teenagers would drop out of school if controversial plans to scrap the Education Maintenance Allowance (EMA) go ahead, research suggests.

National curriculum review: compulsory subjects ‘could be axed’: Compulsory lessons in subjects such as citizenship, IT, music and design and technology could be axed under a sweeping review of the national curriculum.

Write it don’t type it if you want knowledge to stick: Children and students who write by hand learn better than those who type, a study shows.

Text messaging ‘improves children’s spelling skills’: Mobile phone text messaging can boost children’s spelling skills, according to new research.

Ofsted: white boys ‘held back by low expectations’: White working-class boys are falling behind their classmates after being let down by unambitious teachers, according to the education watchdog.

Mayor caught speeding by local schoolchildren: The Mayor of Doncaster has been caught speeding by children in a police road-safety exercise.

Religion must be in key school exam, insist faith leaders: Bishop of Oxford says anti-Islam protests make the subject essential for the English baccalaureate.  Religious leaders and theologians have condemned the decision to leave religious education off the list of GCSEs that go towards the controversial new English baccalaureate.

Coalition seeks to introduce post-exam university admissions: Can the coalition succeed where Labour failed, to make university admissions follow A-level results?

The Children’s Manifesto of 2001: This is what the school children of Britain wanted back in 2001

Unruly behaviour in schools ’caused by boring lessons’: Boring lessons are fuelling bad behaviour in the classroom as unruly children “muck about” to kill time, MPs warned.

Writers speak up over plans to close 450 libraries: Protests against the planned closure of more than 450 library services were staged today. Library users, authors, parents and children took part in “read-ins” and demonstrations at libraries in South Yorkshire, Lancashire, Gloucestershire, Dorset and in Oxfordshire, where 20 of the 43 libraries still running are earmarked for withdrawal of funds.

Education and schools work update

Headlines from the world of education and schools work:

  • Education review of the year 2010: review of the year by the Telegraph.
  • Children in poverty ‘as happy as more affluent classmates’: Research shows kids are most likely to say they feel happy if they can talk to their parents about their worries. Children living in poverty are as happy as classmates from wealthier homes, a study of 32,000 young people has found.
  • More than 500 pupils excluded for assault or abuse every school day: On an average school day 511 pupils in primary, secondary and special needs schools across England are excluded for abusing or assaulting an adult, according to statistics from 2008-9.  On average, 503 of the exclusions are temporary. Of these, 412 are for verbally abuse or threats, while 91 are for physical assault. A further eight exclusions are permanent and are equally distributed between physical and verbal abuse. In total, 96,990 pupils are excluded each school year.  Ministers said the statistics, from the Department for Education, justified their view that plans to “restore discipline in classrooms” were long overdue.
  • Schools ban pupils from using gossip website: Several leading independent schools are trying to block a “pernicious” website which they say encourages pupils to bully each other by posting anonymous gossip.
  • Scrap compulsory acts of worship in schools, say teachers and campaigners: The National Secular Society (NSS) has written to Michael Gove arguing that the legislation, dating from the 1944 Education Act, infringes children’s human rights and discriminates against pupils of no faith and non-Christians.
  • No web access at home for 2m poor pupils, warns charity: E-learning Foundation fears gap between rich and poor at school will widen unless more get home internet access. More than one million children in Britain live in homes without computers and a further two million have no internet connection at home.  The charity analysed a survey of family spending in Britain, published by the Office for National Statistics last year. The study found that 75% of households had a home computer and 71% had an internet connection, a rise of three and five percentage points respectively on 2008. In the richest 10% of homes, 98% had a home computer and 97% had internet access, but in the poorest 10% of homes only 38% had a home computer and 30% an internet connection.
  • Poor pupils ‘fall further behind between seven and 16’: The gap between rich and poor pupils widens throughout primary and secondary school, figures show, as middle-class children benefit the most from state education.
  • Rules on school expulsions ‘will fuel bad behaviour’: Schools will be powerless to expel the worst behaved children under controversial Government reforms, head teachers warn.